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The Intersection of Art and Science: Episode 2, Behind the Lens and Below the Surface

June 23, 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM EDT Free
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The Intersection of Art and Science: Episode 2, Behind the Lens and Below the Surface

conservation photographer and scientist Jennifer Adler

Photo: Bob Croslin/National Geographic

  • When: June 23, 2021, 12:30-1:30 p.m. EDT. Can’t attend the webinar? Register to receive a link to the video recording!
  • Where: Online via Zoom videoconferencing. Please register to receive connection information.

Join us for the second episode in our webinar series exploring the intersection of art and science. Jennifer Adler will take us on an underwater journey as she uses her imagery to communicate science and conservation. She will give a 45-minute presentation followed by 15 minutes of Q&A.

Adler is a conservation photographer and underwater photojournalist. Her work is informed by her scientific background, and she uses her imagery to communicate science and conservation. She has a degree in marine biology from Brown University and a Ph.D. in interdisciplinary ecology from the University of Florida. She specializes in underwater photography and is a trained freediver and cave diver. An ongoing theme in her work is the connection between people and water in a changing climate. Her grant-funded and assignment work has taken her all over the world to document science and conservation for The Nature Conservancy, National Geographic, Huffington Post, and the International Women’s Media Foundation. Adler is a freelance photojournalist represented by National Geographic Image Collection.

A gar swims in the clear waters of a north Florida river.
A gar swims in the clear waters of a north Florida river. Photo © Jennifer Adler
Manatees swim in Florida’s Ichetucknee River.
Manatees swim in Florida’s Ichetucknee River. During the chilly winter months, the manatees swim into the 72°F springs when the ocean drops below this temperature. Unlike seals and whales, they lack a true blubber layer, so they have to stay in warm water to survive. Photo © Jennifer Adler
Swimmer in a limestone spring, silhouetted against the sky.
Diana Dombrowski swims above a limestone spring vent, silhouetted amongst the treetops. Water flowing from these springs will join the Santa Fe River, a tributary of the famous Suwannee River. Photo © Jennifer Adler
Colorful dye is released into a freshwater spring to study hydrology.
Colorful dye takes over Silver Spring as scientists from the University of Florida conduct a study to better understand the hydrology of the karst landscape. Photo © Jennifer Adler
Freshwater turtles swimming in a Florida freshwater spring.
River cooters swim in the reflective waters of a Florida freshwater spring. As vegetation has disappeared from the springs in recent years, the turtles have lost their main supply of food. Photo © Jennifer Adler