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Watershed Restoration

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A Shared Public and Private Investment

Study after study has shown that preventing pollution at its source is considerably cheaper and more effective than treating problems downstream.

Helping landowners make needed improvements takes a combination of outreach, discussion, flexibility, and patience. But no amount of goodwill can surmount gaps in financing and technical knowledge, even where landowners are willing to commit their own dollars to projects that help downstream landowners and water supplies.

“Best Management Walk and Talk Session” hosted by the Stroud Center and Berks County Conservation District. Photo: Lamonte Garber

Stroud™ Water Research Center’s Watershed Restoration Group taps a wide range of public and private funds to help landowners afford projects that can reach into the tens of thousands of dollars, and often more.

Programs offered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture provide the foundation for many of our restoration projects. It’s an “alphabet soup” of programs and acronyms, and we help landowners secure the best program funding to suit their farms and properties. One such program deserves special mention is USDA’s Resource Conservation Partnership Program (RCPP). The Stroud Center and many partner groups and agencies have secured over $20 million dollars through RCPP to support agriculture conservation and restoration projects on farms in the Delaware and Chesapeake Bay watersheds.

Watershed Restoration Staff

Matthew Ehrhart

Matthew Ehrhart

Director of Watershed Restoration
Lamonte Garber

Lamonte Garber

Watershed Restoration Coordinator
Matthew Gisondi

Matthew Gisondi

Watershed Restoration Program Assistant
David Wise

David Wise

Watershed Restoration Manager
Calen Wylie

Calen Wylie

Watershed Restoration Program Assistant

Watershed Restoration News

Volunteers Plant Nearly 1,000 Trees for National Volunteer Week
Volunteers Plant Nearly 1,000 Trees for National Volunteer Week
Stroud Water Research Center restored 2.75 acres along two swales that transport rain water into a major tributary of the Brandywine River, which eventually flows downstream to provide drinking water for the city of Wilmington ... Read More
Dozens of streams protected! Now investing additional $40 million for clean water
Protecting Water Through Collaboration, Science, and Conservation
Stroud Water Research Center is excited to share great news about our work to protect clean water as part of ... Read More
Would You Drink the Water?
Would You Drink the Water?
Stroud Water Research Center collaborated with senior students in the horticulture program at the Williamson College of the Trades on their 2018 Philadelphia Flower Show exhibit entitled “Would You Drink the Water?” ... Read More
Stroud Center Presents at Riparian Forest Buffer Summit
Stroud Center Presents at Riparian Forest Buffer Summit
Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources organized the 2018 Riparian Forest Buffer Summit to provide conservation practitioners and decision makers with information and skills that they can use in their work ... Read More
Rodale Institute, Stroud Water Research Center, Announce Innovative Partnership to Curb Ag Runoff Across 4 States
Rodale Institute, Stroud Water Research Center, Announce Innovative Partnership to Curb Ag Runoff Across 4 States
Supported with a nearly $6 million grant from the William Penn Foundation, the partners begin a new 6-year project to connect farming to cleaner drinking water in the Delaware River Watershed ... Read More
"We've All Got to Be Good Neighbors"
“We’ve All Got to Be Good Neighbors”
Barclay Hoopes’ family has been farming in Landenberg, Pennsylvania, since 1854. He knows how he treats his land affects thousands of people downstream — it sits at the headwaters of White Clay Creek, which makes its way into Delaware and provides drinking water to more than 100,000 people ... Read More
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