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International Research

Our Global Research Efforts

The establishment of Maritza Biological Station marked the beginning of increasingly far-flung travels for Stroud™ Water Research Center researchers and educators, which over the next 30 years would take them literally around the world: to conduct research on the Amazon and Congo rivers and the streams of Papua New Guinea; to lead education workshops in Peru and organize a Leaf Pack group in Kenya in collaboration with Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai’s Green Belt Movement; and most recently, to journey to the bucolic country of Bhutan, high in the Himalayas, to assess water-quality conditions and help set up monitoring and citizen-science programs to enable local communities to protect their freshwater sources, which are at once an enormous economic asset and a fragile natural ecosystem.


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International Research and Education News

Chestnut mandibled toucan
Re-Wilding Tropical Ecosystems Starts With Clean Fresh Water
Bern Sweeney, Ph.D., traveled to Costa Rica in late January to discuss innovative practices in re-wilding tropical ecosystems including rainforests, mangrove forests, streams and wetlands.
Q3ESTRELLAS site, Peru Project.
Los biólogos realizan experimentos para evaluar la salud de los arroyos del Perú
El Centro Amazónico de Educación Ambiental e Investigación (ACEER) y el Centro de Investigación del Agua Stroud presentarán seminarios para el público.
Rafa Morales, station manager at Maritza Biological Station in Costa Rica, with Jamie Blaine, author.
Talking About Rafa: Maritza’s Manager In Words and Pictures
Those who know Morales best describe him with words that are often identical: Intelligent. Conscientious. Responsible. Curious. Honest. Funny.
Rio Tempisquito Sur
Maritza: Unlocking the Secrets of Water in the Developing World
“Our work at Maritza is critical to our mission. It has enabled us to understand global water and climate issues in ways we could not have done without it.”
Map of sampling sites in the Rio Sierpe and Grande de Terraba watersheds in Costa Rica.
Gone Fishin’: Evaluating the Threat of Agricultural Contaminants in the Río Sierpe
Stroud Center scientists sampled the Río Sierpe and Grande de Terraba watersheds to identify contaminants as well as contaminated species that threaten humans who consume them.
Photo of microbes by Jinjun Kan.
Stroud Center Awarded Grant to Study Meta-Ecosystems
Scientists are using new knowledge to provide an update of the River Continuum Concept and develop a broad model of carbon cycling.