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Fluvial Geomorphology

Penn State Water Insights Seminar

800 532 Stroud Water Research Center

Attend in person or online! Stroud Center associate scientist, Melinda Daniels, Ph.D., will showcase a demonstration watershed restoration effort funded following Hurricane Sandy.

Publication title with image of a mayfly

Projected climate change impacts on hydrologic flow regimes in the Great Plains of Kansas

350 210 Stroud Water Research Center

Chatterjee, S., M.D. Daniels, A.Y. Sheshukov, and J. Gao. 2018. River Research and Applications 34(3):195–206.

Nature’s Engineers: Beavers Provide Benefits to Streams

800 532 Stroud Water Research Center

“Before European colonization, beavers would have been ubiquitous across the northern United States Great Lakes region,” explains Melinda Daniels, Associate Research Scientist and Principal Investigator of the Fluvial Geomorphology Group.

Restoring Flood Attenuation and Ecological Resiliency in the Mid-Atlantic Piedmont

800 532 Stroud Water Research Center

For this project, scientists and watershed restoration professionals restore one headwater basin to reduce flooding downstream, improve water quality, and increase stream-ecosystem resilience so that it will once again support…

Collaborative Research: Sediment Stabilization by Animals in Stream Ecosystems: Consequences for Erosion, Ecosystem Processes, and Biodiversity

1024 681 Stroud Water Research Center

Caddisflies and other net-spinning macroinvertebrates attach gravels to one another within the streambed. These attachments result in more force required for flowing water to move the gravels, limiting erosion and…

CNH: Coupled Climate, Cultivation, and Culture in the Great Plains: Understanding Water Supply and Water Quality in a Fragile Landscape

1024 681 Stroud Water Research Center

This collaborative project develops a model to predict the potential impact of climate variability, climate change, land use, and human activity on water resources across decades and centuries in the…

Assessment of Environmental Conditions in Streams of the Runnymede Sanctuary Based on Physical, Chemical, and Macroinvertebrate Monitoring

1024 681 Stroud Water Research Center

The 1,670-acre Runnymede Sanctuary was created to preserve the extensive natural, historic, and scenic resources harbored by the property and to facilitate appropriate study and use of those resources. Its forests,…

Water-Quality Monitoring at Fair Hill Training Center

800 532 Stroud Water Research Center

Scientists are monitoring fecal indicator bacteria, sediment, and water chemistry from the barns at the Fair Hill Training Center. Based on the data collected, the scientists and restoration team will…