Our Focus Is Fresh Water

Who We Are

Since 1967, Stroud™ Water Research Center has been focused on one thing — fresh water. We are dedicated to understanding the ecology of streams, rivers, and their watersheds — both pristine and polluted.

What We Do

The health of freshwater ecosystems is our first line of defense in preserving clean water — and clean water is essential to all life. Our freshwater research, education, and watershed restoration programs enable businesses, policymakers, landowners, and individuals to make informed decisions that affect water quality and availability around the world.

How You Can Help

Show your commitment to research and education programs that are helping to ensure clean and available water here and around the world — become a Friend of Stroud Water Research Center today.


What’s New at the Stroud Center

Volunteers Plant 1,140 Trees Along Red Clay for National Volunteer Week

Stroud Water Research Center celebrated National Volunteer Week by restoring 3.8 acres (approximately 165,528 square feet) along two first-order, headwater tributaries of Red Clay Creek, which is a major tributary of Brandywine Creek and then the Christina River.

Stroud Center Honors Eagle Scout for Design of Outdoor Education Kiosk

Payton Shonk was honored for his Eagle Scout project, an education kiosk, at the Stroud Center’s dedication of a new outdoor classroom. More than 5,000 students and adults have learned about freshwater stewardship at the outdoor classroom since its debut last fall.

WikiWatershed Wins Environmental Excellence Award

WikiWatershed.org has been recognized for equipping teachers, students, local governments, and community organizations to monitor their local stream and watershed health, determine specific location stormwater runoff, and learn how to predict and change human impact on freshwater ecosystems in Pennsylvania.

Laura Zgleszewski uses the qPCR machine

DNA Tool Helps Scientists Identify
Bacteria in Streams

Like a CSI forensic investigator, Stroud Center research technician Laura Zgleszewski is asking the question, “Who are you?” Only instead of hunting criminals, she’s identifying the likely sources of fecal bacteria in streams, a potential human health risk. Read more

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