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Ensign

Dynamics of Phytoplankton Growth and Transport in River Networks From Local to Continental Scales

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The project proposes a transformative approach using real-time monitoring of algae concentrations during storm events to evaluate the effects of excessive nutrients on entire watersheds. The project includes a regional…

Six Stroud Center staff members at a conference.

Sharing Our Science at the National Monitoring Conference

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Along with networking and learning state-of-the-art water quality monitoring techniques, we presented our research to hundreds of water quality specialists.

Closterium algae magnified 20x under a microscope.

A Fresh Look at River Algae in the Delaware River Basin

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A novel method to evaluate how algal concentration changes during river floods may be key to more accurately predicting how to keep algae under control. 

Rachel Johnson and Dave Arscott at the Watershed Heroes event.

Stronger Together: A Nonprofit Partnership Raises Road Salt Awareness

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Stroud Water Research Center is honored to have received the Watershed Heroes Nonprofit Steward award from Tookany/Tacony-Frankford Watershed Partnership.

An EnviroDIY monitoring station next to a USGS gaging station on White Clay Creek near Avondale.

The Best Environmental Sensor: Is EnviroDIY Water Quality Data as Good as USGS?

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For National Water Quality Month and World Water Monitoring Day, we’re putting EnviroDIY to the test!

Phytoplankton Dynamics at the Brandywine River

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High-frequency temperature, oxygen, and chlorophyll sensors, canoe float trips, and nutrient monitoring are the tools being used to study how much and how fast algae grow while they travel down…

Two scientists paddle on the Brandywine Creek in Pennsylvania during an algae bloom.

New Way to Trace Algae Origins Could ID Sources of Water Pollution

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Real-time chlorophyll sensors can be used to determine the origins of algae in rivers and streams. 

Algal bloom in Brandywine Creek where it flows under a railroad bridge.

Who’s Polluting Our Water? Scientists’ New Way to Trace Algae Origins Could Tell Us

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Not all algae are harmful but too much can be deadly. Why? Because when they die, the blooms feed bacteria that rob the water of oxygen. 

Publication title with image of a mayfly

Deciphering the origin of riverine phytoplankton using in situ chlorophyll sensors

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Peipoch, M., and S. Ensign. 2022. Limnology and Oceanography Letters 7(2): 159–166.

A motor boat on the Choptank River, with its wake and a bridge in the distance.

Sediment Sleuthing: Microbe DNA May Be Key to Restoring an Estuary Near You

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Stroud Center science teams are collecting river DNA samples to understand where sediment pollution comes from and the best ways to fight it.