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Freshwater Research

Moving Freshwater Science Forward

Our efforts at Stroud™ Water Research Center require intellectual curiosity, a systematic and rigorous approach to scientific research, and the drive to answer a series of challenging questions about freshwater ecosystems. The answers to these questions may take decades to fully understand, but it is critical that we persist, as they have the power to influence others in ways that positively affect the world’s finite supply of clean fresh water.

Recent Publications

Elucidating stream bacteria utilizing terrestrial dissolved organic matter

Akinwole, P., L. Kaplan, and R. Findlay. 2021. World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology 37, article 32.

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Freshwater Research News

Cloeon dipterum, female imago (adult).
Oxygen Not Behind Threat To Mayflies When Temps Rise
When stream temperatures rise, often as a result of climate change or thermal pollution or a lack of tree shade, mayflies display poorer growth.
Diana Oviedo-Vargas downloading data from a sensor located in White Clay Creek to a field laptop.
Oviedo-Vargas Shares Her STEM Career Journey
The Stroud Center biogeochemist was featured in a women-in-STEM webinar series hosted by EarthEcho International.
A modeling scenario forecasting Delaware River Basin stream health at the end of the 21st century.
Peering at the Future of Stream Water Quality Through a (Very Hazy) Crystal Ball
The crystal ball we're using is a web app that models how water, sediment, nitrogen, and phosphorus move across and underneath the earth’s surface.
Photo of an American eel being weighed as part of a scientific study.
White Clay Creek: A Pennsylvania Stream Responds to Reforestation
The East Branch of White Clay Creek is the subject of a restoration study on a time scale rarely applied to streams or rivers anywhere in the world.
Photo of a farm with a large muddy area with cattle.
A Small Farm Offers Big Opportunities for Measuring Watershed Restoration Success
Stream restorations rarely get monitored rigorously enough to determine if the “patient” has fully recovered.
Schuylkill River Community Scientist Monitoring Project to Kick Off on World Habitat Day
Schuylkill River Community Scientist Monitoring Project to Kick Off on World Habitat Day
The project aims to document the current ecological status and health of the river and seeks to engage and educate a diverse set of river users and residents.