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John Jackson, Ph.D.

500 500 Stroud Water Research Center
John Jackson, Ph.D.

Senior Research Scientist

  • Principal investigator, Entomology Group
  • Adjunct professor of entomology and wildlife ecology, University of Delaware
  • Adjunct professor of biology, University of Pennsylvania

Contact

jkjackson@stroudcenter.org
tel. 610-910-0042
970 Spencer Road, Avondale, PA 19311

Interests and Expertise

John Jackson’s research interests span a variety of applied and basic subjects, including population and evolutionary ecology of stream insects, the role of abiotic and biotic processes in determining the structure and function of stream assemblages, energy and nutrient exchange within streams and between streams and their surrounding watersheds, and benthic monitoring and water quality assessment. Specific projects that address these research interests include studies of growth and development of aquatic insects, the influence of dispersal, population dynamics, and environmental variation on genetic structure of stream organisms, the evolutionary and ecological significance of disturbance in aquatic insect ecology, spatial and temporal variation in the distribution and abundance of stream insects, and organic matter dynamics and secondary production. These studies have been located in temperate and/or tropical streams.

Education

  • Ph.D., entomology, University of California, Berkeley, California.
  • M.S., zoology, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona.
  • B.S., biology (Honors), University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana.

Professional Experience

  • Senior research scientist, Stroud Water Research Center, 2007–present.
  • Adjunct professor, biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 2001–present.
  • Adjunct Professor, entomology and wildlife ecology, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, 1992–present.
  • Associate research scientist, Stroud Water Research Center, 1999–2007.
  • Fulbright senior scholar at Institut für Zoologie und Limnologie, Universität Innsbruck, Austria, 1998.
  • Postdoctoral research associate, assistant curator, and associate curator, Division of Environmental Research, Stroud Water Research Center, The Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 1990–1999.

Publications

Oxygen limitation fails to explain upper chronic thermal limits and the temperature size rule in mayflies

Funk, D.H., B.W. Sweeney, and J.K. Jackson. 2021. Journal of Experimental Biology 224:jeb.233338.

Transcriptomic and life history responses of the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer to chronic diel thermal challenge

Hsuan C., D.D. Jima, D.H. Funk, J.K. Jackson, B.W. Sweeney, and D.B. Buchwalter. 2020. Nature Scientific Reports 10:19119.

Evaluating water quality for Amazonian streams along the Interoceanic Highway in Peru using macroinvertebrates collected by hand and with leaf packs

Sweeney, B.W., J.M. Battle, D.H. Funk, R.W. Flowers, T. Gonzales Ojeda, A. Huamantinco, J.K. Jackson, and M. Arnold. 2020. Limnologica 81, 125759.

Phenological modeling of the parthenogenetic mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) in White Clay Creek

Kolpas, A., D.H. Funk, J.K. Jackson, and B.W. Sweeney. 2019. Ecological Modeling 416, 108892

Why some mayfly adults are older and larger: photoperiodic induction of larval quiescence

Funk, D.H., B.W. Sweeney, and J.K. Jackson. 2019. Freshwater Science 38(4): 725–741.

See publications by all Stroud Center authors

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