Menu
:
:



Entomology Group

600 400 Stroud Water Research Center

The Entomology Group studies factors that affect the distribution and abundance of aquatic invertebrates, the functional role of invertebrates in stream and river ecosystems, and how these invertebrate communities respond to human activities in temperate and tropical watersheds.

Looking for macroinvertebrate identification resources?

Entomology Staff

Juliann Battle

Juliann Battle

Research Technician
Katie Billé

Catherine Billé

Research Technician
Michael Broomall

Michael Broomall

Research Technician, Taxonomic Certification Program Coordinator
David Funk

David Funk

Entomologist, Director of Facilities
Adam Gochnauer

Adam Gochnauer

Research Technician
Courtland Hess

Courtland Hess

Research Technician
John Jackson, Ph.D.

John Jackson, Ph.D.

Senior Research Scientist
Sherman Roberts

Sherman Roberts

Research Technician
Bernard Sweeney, Ph.D.

Bernard Sweeney, Ph.D.

Distinguished Research Scientist

Entomology News

Katie Billé working with a composite macroinvertebrate sample next to a stream.
What Do Yoga, Creek Swimming, and Mystery Author Agatha Christie Have in Common?
Katie Billé left the Stroud Center to pursue a graduate degree in aquatic ecology. With that goal completed, she has returned for a second go at her dream job.
Four scientists collect simulated rainfall from soil in a cornfield in White Clay Creek watershed.
Saving Streams With Good Science
Building trust in the scientific process starts with communicating our research to non-scientists. To that end, our scientists share snapshots of three long-term experiments.
2021 entomology summer intern group photo.
Meet Our 2021 Summer Interns
Our summer internship program, now in its 49th year, has ushered through hundreds of interns seeking meaningful learning experiences.
Stream Degradation and Restoration With Aquatic Insects as Our Guide
Stream Degradation and Restoration With Aquatic Insects as Our Guide
This webinar aimed to help agricultural conservation and ecosystem restoration practitioners reorient efforts toward watershed-scale approaches to achieve local restoration goals.
Stroud Center Science Informed Fracking Ban Decision
Stroud Center Science Informed Fracking Ban Decision
The accidental release of hydraulic fracking wastewater into streams, even a single drop mixed with 100 drops of streamwater, will harm or kill aquatic insects and even certain fish species.
Cloeon dipterum, female imago (adult).
Oxygen Not Behind Threat To Mayflies When Temps Rise
When stream temperatures rise, often as a result of climate change or thermal pollution or a lack of tree shade, mayflies display poorer growth.