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Ecosystem Ecology Group

800 532 Stroud Water Research Center

About the Group

The Ecosystem Ecology Group focuses on interactions among physical, chemical, and biological elements of riverine ecosystems that organize ecological behavior at local and regional scales. We are also interested in the effects of global change (land use, atmospheric deposition, emergent contaminants) on the structure and function of streams and rivers, and the need for more socio-ecological perspectives on conservation and restoration of running water ecosystems.

Ecosystem Ecology Staff

Photo of Stephanie Bernasconi hiking in the mountains

Stephanie Bernasconi

Research Technician, Part-Time Environmental Educator
Sara Damiano

Sara Damiano

Research Technician
Michael Gentile

Michael Gentile

Research Technician
Marc Peipoch, Ph.D.

Marc Peipoch, Ph.D.

Assistant Research Scientist
Myriah Wadley

Myriah Wadley

Research Technician, Part-Time Environmental Educator

Ecosystem Ecology News

Publication title with image of a mayfly
Biophysical heterogeneity, hydrologic connectivity, and productivity of a montane floodplain forest
Peipoch, M., P.B. Davis, and H.M. Valett. 2022. Ecosystems, early online access.
The Viscosity Effect: A Newly Found Connection Between the Riparian Zone and Water Quality
The Viscosity Effect: A Newly Found Connection Between the Riparian Zone and Water Quality
A new Stroud Center study shows that the density of water plays a previously overlooked role in nutrient and carbon cycling in freshwater ecosystems.
Two scientists paddle on the Brandywine Creek in Pennsylvania during an algae bloom.
New Way to Trace Algae Origins Could ID Sources of Water Pollution
Real-time chlorophyll sensors can be used to determine the origins of algae in rivers and streams. 
Publication title with image of a mayfly
A global synthesis of human impacts on the multifunctionality of streams and rivers
Brauns, M., D.C. Allen, I.G. Boëchat, W.F. Cross, V. Ferreira, D. Graeber, C.J. Patrick, M. Peipoch, D. von Schiller, and B. Gücker. 2022. Global Change Biology, early online access.
Publication title with image of a mayfly
Metabolism and soil water viscosity control diel patterns of nitrate and DOC in a low order temperate stream
Oviedo-Vargas, D., M. Peipoch, and C. Dow. 2022. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences 127(5), e2021JG006640.
Algal bloom in Brandywine Creek where it flows under a railroad bridge.
Who’s Polluting Our Water? Scientists’ New Way to Trace Algae Origins Could Tell Us
Not all algae are harmful but too much can be deadly. Why? Because when they die, the blooms feed bacteria that rob the water of oxygen.