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Watershed Restoration Group

400 265 Stroud Water Research Center

The Watershed Restoration Group engages the public in freshwater stewardship and watershed restoration by helping landowners implement best management practices and plant streamside forest buffers. We link research, education, and action on the ground to manage our most precious resource — fresh water.

Watershed Restoration Staff

Photo of Lisa Blazure

Lisa Blazure

Soil Health Coordinator
Will Curley wearing a Philadelphia Eagles jersey.

Wills Curley

Watershed Restoration Project Coordinator
Rebecca Duczkowski

Rebecca Duczkowski

Assistant Director of Donor Relations and Watershed Restoration Assistant
Matthew Ehrhart

Matthew Ehrhart

Director of Watershed Restoration
Lamonte Garber

Lamonte Garber

Watershed Restoration Coordinator
Headshot of David Wise.

David Wise

Watershed Restoration Manager
Calen Wylie

Calen Wylie

Watershed Restoration Program Assistant

Watershed Restoration News

How to Plant a Small Containerized Seedling in a Riparian Forest Buffer
How to Plant a Small Containerized Seedling in a Riparian Forest Buffer
Watch step-by-step instructions on how to plant a tree in a riparian forest buffer and protect it from deer, rodents, and flood damage to increase survivability.
Stone mulch at the base of a sheltered tree, protecting it from rodent damage.
Stone Rivals Herbicides as New Method to Protect Baby Trees From Rodents
During the first five years of growth, young trees need to be protected from chewing — from deer above and rodents below.
Cover crop coach Steve Groff shows what is left of cotton underwear after being buried for 60 days.
Dirt Diaries: Soil Health Campaign Drives Underwear Digs Across Pennsylvania
For the past two months, the soil life — worms, small insects, bacteria, fungi — has been chomping away at the 100% cotton underwear.
Entomologists collect freshwater insects for a project that examines the impact of streamside restoration on water quality.
Breaking the Fall
How the Clean Water Act changed the trajectory of America’s waterways and became a beacon for freshwater science.
Jeff and Sue Frey in front of farm buildings, photo courtesy of American Agriculturist.
Stroud Center Partners Named Mid-Atlantic Master Farmers
Jeff and Sue Frey received a lifetime achievement award that recognizes exemplary role models of outstanding management, land stewardship, and community leadership. 
After 60 days in the soil, very little is left of cotton underwear, indicating good soil health.
Boxers or Briefs? As Long as They’re Cotton, They’ll Dish the Dirt on Soil
How does your garden grow? Anyone with a farm field, backyard garden, or lawn can find out by planting a pair of underwear!