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Watershed Restoration

Interested in streamside buffers or soil health practices for your property? Please tell us about your interest here.

Watershed Restoration: A Shared Public and Private Investment

Stroud Water Research Center works hand in hand with landowners, helping them use their land more effectively through whole-farm planning and watershed stewardship.

Our expert team sets up the collaborations and partnerships necessary to achieve the highest level of freshwater conservation. The Stroud Center and many partner groups and agencies have secured over $20 million dollars through USDA’s Resource Conservation Partnership Program to support agriculture conservation and restoration projects on farms in the Delaware and Chesapeake Bay watersheds.


Archival photo of Robin L. Vannote, Ph.D., working at an indoor stream flume.

The Robin L. Vannote Watershed Restoration Program is named for Robin Vannote, Ph.D., a research scientist and the Stroud Center’s first director. Under Vannote’s leadership, the Stroud Center evolved from a dream to an institution at the forefront of freshwater research. The Stroud Center has benefited enormously from Vannote’s hard work, keen insight, and long-term scientific vision since 1966, and the naming of the Watershed Restoration Program is a fitting tribute.


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Watershed Restoration Staff

Photo of Lisa Blazure

Lisa Blazure

Soil Health Coordinator
Will Curley wearing a Philadelphia Eagles jersey.

Wills Curley

Watershed Restoration Project Coordinator
Headshot of Rebecca Duczkowski.

Rebecca Duczkowski

Assistant Director of Donor Relations
Headshot of Matt Ehrhart.

Matthew Ehrhart

Director of Watershed Restoration
Headshot of Lamonte Garber

Lamonte Garber

Watershed Restoration Coordinator
Amanda Garzio-Hadzick

Amanda Garzio-Hadzick

Watershed Restoration Specialist
Headshot of Heather Titanich.

Heather Titanich

Watershed Restoration Coordinator
Headshot of David Wise.

David Wise

Watershed Restoration Manager
Calen Wylie

Calen Wylie

Watershed Restoration Program Assistant

Watershed Restoration News

Dozens of streams protected! Now investing additional $40 million for clean water
Protecting Water Through Collaboration, Science, and Conservation
The Stroud Center is excited to share great news about our work to protect clean water as part of the Delaware River Watershed Initiative. We are proud to be one of 65 organizations across the region to working to protect forests and farms, clean up streams, and green communities.
Would You Drink the Water?
Would You Drink the Water?
Stroud Water Research Center collaborated with senior students in the horticulture program at the Williamson College of the Trades on their 2018 Philadelphia Flower Show exhibit entitled “Would You Drink the Water?”
Stroud Center Presents at Riparian Forest Buffer Summit
Stroud Center Presents at Riparian Forest Buffer Summit
Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources organized the 2018 Riparian Forest Buffer Summit to provide conservation practitioners and decision makers with information and skills that they can use in their work.
Rodale Institute, Stroud Water Research Center, Announce Innovative Partnership to Curb Ag Runoff Across 4 States
Rodale Institute, Stroud Water Research Center, Announce Innovative Partnership to Curb Ag Runoff Across 4 States
Supported with a nearly $6 million grant from the William Penn Foundation, the partners begin a new 6-year project to connect farming to cleaner drinking water in the Delaware River Watershed.
A fence keeps cows away from the stream.
“We’ve All Got to Be Good Neighbors”
Barclay Hoopes’ family has been farming in Landenberg, Pennsylvania, since 1854. He knows how he treats his land affects thousands of people downstream — it sits at the headwaters of White Clay Creek, which makes its way into Delaware and provides drinking water to more than 100,000 people.
Deep purple fruit on an elderberry bush.
Berries and Nuts: a Different Approach to Riparian Buffers
Planting trees and shrubs on streamside crop land improves water quality. What if you could plant a buffer that would protect a stream and yield a crop?